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Cerebral venous thrombosis risk factors

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis risk factor

  1. It has been found in association with fibrous thyroiditis, jugular thrombosis after catheterization, or idiopathic jugular vein stenosis. Other factors include surgery, head trauma, arterio-venous malformations, infection, paraneoplastic, and autoimmune disease
  2. What are the risk factors for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis? Children and adults have different risk factors for CVST. Risk factors for children and infants include: Problems with the way their blood forms clot
  3. BACKGROUND: Data from African countries regarding diagnosis, prognosis, management, and outcome of patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are limited. The aim of the present study is to characterize clinical presentation, predisposing factors, neuroimaging findings, and outcomes of the disease in the Tunisian population
Cerebral Venous Thrombosis – Core EM

INTRODUCTION: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed Pregnancy, postpartum state, and hormonal contraceptive therapy are the most frequent risk factors in women with cerebral venous thrombosis. Localized infections, such as otitis, mastoiditis, sinusitis, and meningitis and systemic infectious disorders, are also associated with cerebral venous thrombosis Who is at risk for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis? Children and adults have different risk factors for CVST. Risk factors for children and infants include: Problems with the way their blood forms clot

Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) Johns Hopkins

Cerebral venous thrombosis: clinical features, risk

Clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of cerebral

Risk factors are summarized in Table 3. Thrombophilia (56%), either genetic or acquired, and obstetric and gynecologic causes (pregnancy, puerperium and oral contraceptives) (50%) were the most common risk factors. Seventy-four percent of cases with thrombophilia were women It has been found in association with fibrous thyroiditis, jugular thrombosis after catheterization, or idiopathic jugular vein stenosis. Other factors include surgery, head trauma, arteriovenous malformations, infection, paraneoplastic, and autoimmune disease Pregnancy and the postpartum period are generally considered to be risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but no controlled studies have quantified the risk Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) of the right transverse sinus was detected without any infarction or oedema findings (Figure 2). We did not determine any risk factors for CVT, such as a connective tissue disorder or local infection of the head, neck, or sinuses. His antithrombin 3 level was normal (73.7% [70-130%])

Early seizures in cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: Risk factors and role of antiepileptics. Stroke. 2008. 39: 1152-8. 3. Ferro JM, Canhão P, Stam J, Bousser MG, Barinagarrementeria F. Prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: Results of the international study on cerebral vein and Dural sinus thrombosis (ISCVT) Among the hematologic abnormalities, venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) has been reported in the literature, with a 25% higher risk in patients with CD compared with the general population. 3 VTE is most often located in the abdomen or lower limbs, but the cerebral localization has been exceptionally described. 4 Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis risk factors. IntroductionCerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an uncommon disease representing roughly 1% of all strokes, marked by clotting of blood in cerebral venous or dural sinuses, and in rare cases, cortical veins. The first detailed account of CVST appeared in 1825, in France, which was attributed.

Background. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an uncommon cause of stroke (<1%) (Nwajei F, et al., 2020), with an annual incidence of 2-5 cases per million people, more commonly occurring in younger patients, particularly women.Most common symptoms are headache, seizures and focal neurologic deficits, while several risk factors, like an inherited coagulopathy, an antecedent history of. Risk factors for CVT in patients with leukemia included treatment with asparaginase, high-dose steroid regimens, intrathecal methotrexate injections in acute lymphoblastic leukemia [ 13, 14, 15 ], and all-transretinoic acid in acute promyelocytic leukemia [ 16 ]

Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Circulatio

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) occurs when a blood clot forms in the brain's venous sinuses. The clot prevents blood from draining out of the brain. As a result, blood cells may break and leak blood into the brain tissues, forming a hemorrhage. This chain of events is part of a stroke that can occur in adults and children of all ages COVID-19 leads to a several-times higher risk of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) blood clots than current COVID-19 vaccines. Researchers at the University of Oxford have today reported that the risk of the rare blood clotting known as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) following COVID-19 infection is around 100 times greater than normal, several. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is a type of blood clot that forms in your brain. The clot can cause a brain bleed that leads to stroke that needs immediate medical attention Sébire G, Tabarki B, Saunders DE, et al. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children: risk factors, presentation, diagnosis and outcome. Brain 2005; 128:477. Schobess R, Düring C, Bidlingmaier C, et al. Long-term safety and efficacy data on childhood venous thrombosis treated with a low molecular weight heparin: an open-label pilot study of.

Factor V Leiden mutation is a risk factor for cerebral venous thrombosis: a case-control study of 55 patients Stroke , 29 ( 12 ) ( 1998 ) , pp. 2507 - 2510 View Record in Scopus Google Schola Covid-19 is associated with a far greater risk of cerebral venous thrombosis than the vaccinations that protect against it, early research from the University of Oxford has shown. The results, available as a non-peer reviewed preprint,1 show that the risk of cerebral venous thrombosis is many-fold higher after covid-19 than after receiving a vaccine, Maxime Taquet, NIHR academic clinical. At least one risk factor was identified in more than 85% of patients with cerebral venous thrombosis, and multiple risk factors are found in more than 50% of patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. In general, cerebral venous thrombosis is common in any condition that leads to a prothrombotic state, including pregnancy, the post-partum state.

Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) Cedars-Sina

Stroke without typical risk factors or in the setting of seizure. • Unexplained intracranial hypertension. • Multiple hemorrhagic infarcts, or hemorrhagic infarcts not in a specific arterial distribution. • Objective neurologic deficits in a patient with risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis Risk factors for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis overlap with those of other venous thromboembolism sites; however, some are specific for this particular anatomical district. Prognosis is favorable in most cases if diagnosis is made rapidly and treatment is promptly initiated, even if acute complications or chronic invalidity still occur in a.

Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT): Symptoms and Treatmen

  1. Management of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Occurring After Vaccination Against SARS-CoV-2. The risk of CVT following AZ vaccine being estimated as only five cases per million vaccinated people, it is evident that no randomized trials are possible to inform management decisions
  2. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis risk factors Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis risk factors Saadatnia, Mohammad; Fatehi, Farzad; Basiri, Keivan; Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Mehr, Gilda Kinani 2009-04-01 00:00:00 Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is an uncommon disease marked by clotting of blood in cerebral venous, or dural sinuses, and, in rare cases, cortical veins
  3. Risk Factors. CVT is more common in people who are age 50 years and older. It is also more common in women with higher levels of estrogen. Other things that may increase the risk of CVT include: Blood clotting disorders, such as factor V Leiden and antiphospholipid antibodies Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). EBSCO DynaMed website
  4. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children: Risk factors, presentation, diagnosis and outcom
  5. In their review of 15 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (13 of whom had clinical risk factors), Hillier et al. 5 retrospectively screened for factor V Leiden mutations and 5,10 methylene.
  6. Background: Aseptic cerebral venous thrombosis (ACVT) can develop in patients with hereditary and acquired thrombophilic conditions, which are diagnosed in 34% of cases. Common hereditary factors include polymorphisms in the Leiden V and prothrombin genes, deficiencies in proteins C and S, and antithrombin III
  7. Deschiens and associates performed systematic coagulation studies in 40 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis and found that 4 cases (10%) had APC-R with heterozygous factor V Leiden; all of those cases were associated with other risk factors, including systemic lupus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, nephrotic syndrome (154), and.

Epidemiology. Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare condition accounting for approximately 0.5% of all cases of cerebrovascular disease worldwide 8.Demographics of affected patients reflects underlying predisposing factors, which are identified in the majority of cases (87.5%) with many patients having more than one coexistent risk factors 2:. hormona The cerebral veins are an unusual site of thrombosis, and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a distinct cause of stroke. In contrast to both venous thromboembolism (VTE) and arterial stroke, CVT predominantly affects young adults and children. Patients can present with a range of signs and symptoms

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a thrombotic disease of the cerebral veins and major dural sinuses. It is a rare kind of venous thromboembolism and can also be thought of as a type of stroke. CVT accounts for 0.5-1% of stroke cases. The annual incidence is 0.2 - 1.6 per 100,000 people Risk factors for recurrent venous thrombosis were male sex (adjusted hazard ratio, 9.66; 95% confidence interval, 2.86 to 32.7) and, for thromboses other than CSVT, severe thrombophilia resulting.

Cerebral venous thrombosis: a practical guide Practical

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare disease with an estimated incidence of around .5/100.000/year ( 1, 2) to 2/100.000/year ( 3, 4 ), and only accounts for a small proportion (1%) of all strokes. The possible underlying causes or risk factors span a broad spectrum of conditions. These range from focal-like infections of the central. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) of the right transverse sinus was detected without . ase eport ID-1 2 TEIES I EGY any infarction or oedema findings (Figure 2). We did not determine any risk factors for CVT, such as a connective tissue disorder or local infection of the head, neck, or sinuses. His antithrombin 3 level was norma

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) occurs when a blood clot forms in the brain's venous sinuses. Respond quickly to symptoms like headaches, blurry vision, fainting, losing control of a part of your body, and seizures. If you have the above symptoms, have someone take you immediately to the emergency room or call 911 for help Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare but serious complication of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy. No available consensus exists regarding its risk factors and appropriate management due to the rarity of cases Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all unexplained CNS disorders of sudden onset. Etiological factors are often subclinical forms of several common thrombophilic states occurring together, rather than the typical inherited and rare causes. Diagnosis is missed because of the heterogeneity in clinical presentation and etiological factors

C erebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), first described in 1825 by Ribes, has remained a difficult condition to diagnose and manage. 13 There are multiple risk factors that can lead to spontaneous CVST, including trauma, infection, hematological disorders, oral contraceptives, malignancy, and dehydration. 8,18,22 CVST of varying degrees is also a well-documented complication of neurosurgical. Several case reports have linked iron deficiency anemia with the occurrence of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) or stroke, yet, it is unclear whether this is a chance association. In a case-control design data of whole blood count and screening for thrombophilic coagulation abnormalities of 121 prospectively identified patients with CVT and 120 healthy controls were compared Epidemiology. Any age women on the contraceptive pill are over-represented. Please refer to the article on cerebral venous thrombosis for a broad discussion on epidemiology and risk factors.. Clinical presentation. Presentation is variable and can range from asymptomatic to coma and death

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can infrequently lead to chronical intracranial hypertension (IH) due to the altered venous drainage. The aim of this study was to ascertain the risk of IH after CVST and to stratify underlying risk factors. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all cases treated for acute CVST at our department between 2013 and 2019 Aseptic cerebral venous thrombosis (ACVT) can develop in patients with hereditary and acquired thrombophilic conditions, which are diagnosed in 34% of cases. Common hereditary factors include polymorphisms in the Leiden V and prothrombin genes, deficiencies in proteins C and S, and antithrombin III

The signs and symptoms of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) can vary depending on a child's age. In newborns, CVT typically causes seizures, irritability and extreme sleepiness. Children and adolescents with CVT tend to experience additional symptoms Certain drugs, preg- symptoms, the interval between the initiation of the nancy, infection, systemic inflammation, cancer and symptoms and the diagnosis, findings of CT, MRI, THE RISK FACTORS AND THE TREATMENT COURSE OF CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS 231 or MR angiography, the location of the thrombus, the reported in some 9.7% of the patients

New Horizons for Diagnostic Pitfalls of Cerebral Venous

  1. Risk factors for recurrent venous thromboembolism in the European collaborative paediatric database on cerebral venous thrombosis: a multicentre cohort study. Lancet Neurol. 6 , 595-603 (2007)
  2. Thromb Hemost 2016;42:622-631. Silvis SM, et al. Cerebral venous.
  3. can be considered for patients who have no CVT risk factors, patients with recurrent thrombosis, patients with a family history of venous thrombosis, or in the setting of warfarin‑induced skin necrosis25 ,57 58. Haemoglobin electrophoresis should be performed in suspected cases of sickle cell disease or thalassaemia. Lumbar punctur
  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare cause of stroke, with an incidence of approximately 1.3 per 100,000 per year. 1 The median age is 37 years and the female-to-male sex ratio is 3:1. 2,3 In CVT, a blood clot forms in one or more of the cerebral venous sinuses or veins, blocking drainage of venous blood and cerebral spinal fluid
  5. Thromb Hemost 2016;42:622-631
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (cvst)

(PDF) Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosi

Table 2 shows the results of multivariable analysis of risk factors for all thrombotic events as well as arterial versus venous thrombosis. The most remarkable and relatively novel finding is the fact that only male sex (P = .04; hazard ratio [HR] = 2) predicted venous thrombosis Cerebral Venous and Dural Sinus Thrombosis Disease Entity. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a clot in the venous drainage system of the brain and can present to ophthalmology. Epidemiology. CVST is an uncommon type of stroke. It accounts for 0.5-1% of all strokes and affects approximately 5 per one million people annually Background: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) occurs commonly in young female adults and is caused by various risk factors. Our aim was to determine the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of Japanese CVT patients. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective study of CVT patients from January 2010 to June 2015. In the patients who had hyperhomocysteinemia, vitamin. Little is known about the long‐term outcome or risk of recurrence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, although one study reports as high a risk as 12%. 57 Patients also have an increased risk (14%) of venous thrombosis elsewhere (DVT, PE)

Cerebral venous thrombosis tends to present in younger patients, with a mean age of 39 years, and 80% of patients presenting under the age of 50. It is 3 times more common in females than males, although that disparity disappears in older patients, in whom cancer is the primary risk factor. Up to 90% of patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and thrombocytopenia can occur after receipt of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The mechanism for this new syndrome appears to be similar to autoimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis of this syndrome includes identifying an acute thrombosis AND thrombocytopenia followed by HIT ELISA testing Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare but serious cerebrovascular disorder affecting children from the newborn period through childhood and adolescence. The incidence is estimated at .6/100,000/year, with 30-50% occurring in newborns. Causes are diverse and are highly age dependent. Acute systemic illness is the dominant risk factor among newborns a Risk Factor in Japanese Patients. J Neurol Neurosci. Vol. 8 No. 5:219 Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis: Incidence and Hyperhomocysteinemia as a Risk Factor in Japanese Patients Abstract Background: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) occurs commonly in young female adults and is caused by various risk factors. Our aim was to determine th

Cerebral venous thrombosis: influence of risk factors and

The intent of this review is to summarize the corporate literature of both acquired and congenital risk factors associated with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in order to assist clinicians in their search for underlying mechanisms and to risk stratify patients for anticoagulation treatment duration and risk of recurrent thrombosis Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a complex venous thromboembolic (VTE) phenomenon with variable clinical presentation, many etiologies, and multiple potential an imbalance likely due to CVST risk factors such as pregnancy, post-partum state, and oral contraceptive use (5,7,8). The median age of patients ranges from 37 to 4

Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) > Fact Sheets

OBJECTIVES Dural puncture is regarded a safe procedure when contraindications are carefully excluded and has so far not been recognised as a risk factor for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Five patients are described with CVST after dural puncture in the presence of additional risk factors. METHODS In four out of five patients complete investigations for thrombophilia were performed. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of. Risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis. The following lisk of risk factors was compiled using UpToDate and Ferro et al (2004). The latter was a multinational multicentre observational study which identified 624 patients with confirmed CVT. Of this group, the following risk factors were observed: Genetic thrombophilia (22.4% of cases Lüdemann P, Nabavi DG, Junker R, et al. Factor V Leiden mutation is a risk factor for cerebral venous thrombosis: a case-control study of 55 patients. Stroke 1998; 29:2507. Weih M, Junge-Hülsing J, Mehraein S, et al. [Hereditary thrombophilia with ischemiC stroke and sinus thrombosis. Diagnosis, therapy and meta-analysis]. Nervenarzt 2000; 71.

Cerebral venous thrombosis as a rare cause of subarachnoidCerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Signaled by Bilateral

Diagnosis and management of cerebral venous thrombosis

Twenty patients (57.14%) were on corticosteroids at the time of the CVST event, 9-13,15-18,21,22,25,28,30,31,33,34 and corticosteroid use represented the only risk factor for CVST in 6 of these patients. 13,15,21,22,25-34 One patient was reported to have experienced multiple thrombotic episodes, including CVST, Budd-Chiari syndrome, and. Importance Obesity is a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism. To date, however, whether obesity is associated with adult cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has not been assessed. Objective To assess whether obesity is a risk factor for CVT.. Design, Setting, and Participants A case-control study was performed in consecutive adult patients with CVT admitted from. Importance Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) with thrombocytopenia, a rare and serious condition, has been described in Europe following receipt of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (Oxford/AstraZeneca), which uses a chimpanzee adenoviral vector. A mechanism similar to autoimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) has been proposed Background: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare and life-threatening cerebrovascular disease in children. Aims: In this study, clinical presentations, prothrombotic risk factors, thrombosis localization, and anticoagulant treatment results of children with CVST were evaluated. Methods: Between January 2011 and September 2018, 29 patients (0-18 years) diagnosed with CSVT in.

Venous Thrombosis | Harvard University

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis - Wikipedi

Agostoni E. Headache in cerebral venous thrombosis. Neurol Sci 2004;25(Suppl 3):S206 -S210. Ferro JM, Canhao P, Bousser MG, Stam J, Barinagarrementeria F. Early seizures in cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: risk factors and role of antiepileptics. Stroke 2008;39:1152-1158 The frequency of patients diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has increased due to the expanded use of noninvasive brain imaging methods. The aim of this study was to assess the. In previous studies, several factors such as male sex, age > 37 years, acute symptom onset, seizures, coma, mental status disorder, GCS scores < 9, hemorrhagic infarction, thrombosis of the deep cerebral venous system, posterior fossa involvement, central nervous system infection, and cancer were considered independent risk factors for poor. The main characteristics, and inherited and acquired risk factors for thrombosis, are presented in Table 2. Inherited or acquired risk factors for thrombosis were detected in 62 patients (82.6%), the remaining 13 (17.4%) had no identifiable risk factors for CVST Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), which includes the thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is quite a rare disorder when looked at from a societal perspective. In fact, the annual incidence rate is estimated to be around three to four cases per million. 1 , 2 However, its several risk factors can make certain groups very.

Posts tagged &quot;isolated-cortical-vein-thrombosis

(PDF) Clinical Profile And Risk Factors of Cerebral Venous

Background. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a form of stroke whereby thrombosis occurs in the cerebral venous sinuses or veins. The incidence of CVST has been estimated at three to five cases per million population per year (1, 2).This represents about 0.5-1% of all strokes (1, 2).CVST affects the younger population (age <50 years) and is three times more common in women than men () Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is more common in women than in men, possibly due to gender-specific risk factors in young adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the clinical and radiological findings, other risk factors, and clinical course of CVST associated with pregnancy and puerperium differ from those of other CVST cases Cerebral venous thrombosis is characterized by infarction with focal neurologic deficits and increased intracranial pressure. As a very rare complication of some vaccines against Covid-19, the disorder is accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation and hemorrhage The controls were part of the Dutch Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of Risk Factors for Venous Thrombosis (MEGA) study. Overall, patients with CVT were more likely to be younger than controls (median age 40 years vs. 48 years) Inflammatory bowel disease is a known risk factor for cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in adults and children. The precise mechanism of the thrombotic event is unclear in IBD patients. We report a case of ulcerative colitis with CVT admitted for acute relapse

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children: risk factors

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cause of stroke that accounts for 0.5-1.0% of all strokes. Clinical presentation, predisposing factors, neuroimaging findings, and outcomes of CVST are extremely diverse, which causes a high index of suspicion in diagnosis. Therefore, early diagnosis of CVST is crucial for prompt treatment to prevent morbidity and mortality Introduction Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an acute cerebrovascular disease diagnosed nowadays more frequently. Magnetic resonance venogram (MRV) is the modality of choice for accurate diagnosis. Young females in their childbearing age are prone to develop CVST. Clinical presentation is mainly with headache, focal neurologic deficits, and seizures Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is rare but now increasingly diagnosed in children. Early diagnosis is of prime importance as any delay leads to significant mortality and morbidity. It requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose CVST early as, often, the symptoms are vague and the signs are nonspecific. Varieties of aetiologies are described for generation of cerebral venous sinus.

Internal jugular, subclavian and brachiocephalic veinIntracerebral Hemorrhagic Stroke | Nurse Key

Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Clinical Features, Risk

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), a rare and life threatening complication of nephrotic syndrome, has a variable and non-specific presentation, posing diagnostic challenges. We describe a case of CVT in a Sierra Leonean child with nephrotic syndrom Gunes HN, Cokal BG, Guler SK, et al.: Clinical associations, biological risk factors and outcomes of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.. J Int Med Res. 2016, 44:1454-1461. 10.1177/0300060516664807; Rasmussen L, Dybdal M, Gerstoft J, et al.: HIV and risk of venous thromboembolism: a Danish nationwide population‐based cohort study. HIV Med. 2011. Of 20 subjects with CSVT and SDH, 19 had known risk factors for SDH. The remaining subject had a chronic SDH identified concomitantly to a newly symptomatic CSVT with accompanying venous infarctions. Conclusions: SDH in the setting of CSVT is typically identified in children with independent risk factors for SDH